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  • Art and the Default Mode Network

    Art and the Default Mode Network

    A recent symposium presented by Columbia and NYU explored what happens in our brain when we’re at rest, and why those same brain regions are crucial when we view art.

  • Gallery + Interview: Megan McGlynn

    Gallery + Interview: Megan McGlynn

    Inside their intricate worlds, Megan McGlynn’s sculptures hint at the complexity, functionality, and organizational principles of minds.

  • Subjective Resonance Imaging: Gallery + Essay

    Subjective Resonance Imaging: Gallery + Essay

    “Subjective Resonance Imaging” was an international group gallery show co-organized by The Beautiful Brain and The Neuro Bureau for the 2013 Human Brain Mapping conference in Seattle, June 16-20, 2013, featuring the work of 12 artists.

  • Interview: Michele Guerra

    Interview: Michele Guerra

    Michele Guerra is Assistant Professor of Cinema at the University of Parma (Italy), where he conducts cognitive science research into cinema, alongside Vittorio Gallese.

  • Interview: Idan Segev

    Interview: Idan Segev

    Idan Segev, Professor of Computational Neuroscience at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, also has a keen interest in interdisciplinary dialogues: he served as editor of a special edition of the journal Frontiers recently dedicated exclusively to neuroaesthetics research.

Galleries

Gallery + Interview: Megan McGlynn
[ 1 ] September 9, 2013

Gallery + Interview: Megan McGlynn

Inside their intricate worlds, Megan McGlynn’s sculptures hint at the complexity, functionality, and organizational principles of minds.

Subjective Resonance Imaging: Gallery + Essay
[ 2 ] July 12, 2013

Subjective Resonance Imaging: Gallery + Essay

“Subjective Resonance Imaging” was an international group gallery show co-organized by The Beautiful Brain and The Neuro Bureau for the 2013 Human Brain Mapping conference in Seattle, June 16-20, 2013, featuring the work of 12 artists.

Affecting Perception: Interview + Gallery
[ 11 ] March 6, 2013

Affecting Perception: Interview + Gallery

A new gallery show in Oxford presents the work of artists affected by neurological conditions, and contemporary art inspired by discoveries in neuroscience. We interviewed the three co-curators of the show about issues in art and neuroscience.

Essays

What We Talk About When We Talk About Genius
[ 10 ] April 25, 2013

What We Talk About When We Talk About Genius

A personal essay about the meaning of genius and the importance of intellectual ancestry.

The Cold Humanists
[ 7 ] January 18, 2013

The Cold Humanists

The cold humanists have arrived: a parade of skeptical voices, mostly from the humanities, that has steadily gone about dismissing the brain sciences with a cold, cynical, and doubtful attitude— as if neuroscience has long overstayed its welcome, and must now be hurried out the door. Noah Hutton offers a response.

Art and Neuroscience: a State of the Union
[ 5 ] September 9, 2012

Art and Neuroscience: a State of the Union

Ahead of an art/brain panel discussion this week in Brooklyn, NY, Noah Hutton presents an outline of the current state of the dialogue between the arts and brain sciences, with three major lines of inquiry apparent.

Dispatches

Art and the Default Mode Network
[ 1 ] February 17, 2014

Art and the Default Mode Network

A recent symposium presented by Columbia and NYU explored what happens in our brain when we’re at rest, and why those same brain regions are crucial when we view art.

Interview: Michele Guerra
[ 1 ] July 12, 2013

Interview: Michele Guerra

Michele Guerra is Assistant Professor of Cinema at the University of Parma (Italy), where he conducts cognitive science research into cinema, alongside Vittorio Gallese.

Interview: Idan Segev
[ 3 ] July 11, 2013

Interview: Idan Segev

Idan Segev, Professor of Computational Neuroscience at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, also has a keen interest in interdisciplinary dialogues: he served as editor of a special edition of the journal Frontiers recently dedicated exclusively to neuroaesthetics research.

Reviews

Deconstructing the Conscious Mind, Theatrically
[ 1 ] November 7, 2012

Deconstructing the Conscious Mind, Theatrically

Noah Hutton reviews The Deconstructive Theatre Project’s recent production of The Orpheus Variations. In its innovative blend of live projection and constantly shifting scenery, the play was a fascinating reflection of the constant stitching-together of human consciousness.

Gateway Books: The Storytelling Animal
[ 7 ] June 17, 2012

Gateway Books: The Storytelling Animal

Ben Ehrlich reviews Jonathan Gottschall’s new book, “The Storytelling Animal,” whose main idea is a magical one: we are Homo fictus– fiction fiends– creatures of an imaginative realm called Neverland, “where we ramble in make believe.”

Seeing Ourselves: A Brain and Art Gallery Show Hits New York City
[ 6 ] April 10, 2012

Seeing Ourselves: A Brain and Art Gallery Show Hits New York City

Visual art and neuroscience are stitched together in a new gallery show in New York City at MUSECPMI, and the results are a mixed bag of intriguing syntheses and frustrating shortcomings. Noah reviews “Seeing Ourselves.”

Podcasts

PODCAST: An Interview with Carl Schoonover
[ 7 ] January 4, 2011

PODCAST: An Interview with Carl Schoonover

To kick off our new season of The Beautiful Brain Podcast, host Noah Hutton sits down with Carl Schoonover, author of “Portraits of the Mind,” to talk about how we have imaged the brain from antiquity to the present.

PODCAST: The Philosophy of Art and Mind
[ 3 ] September 13, 2010

PODCAST: The Philosophy of Art and Mind

In this month’s podcast we proudly present a conversation with the outspoken artist and author Garry Kennard. Kennard, the founder of artandmind.org, and has hosted many conferences and festivals that have brought together leading thinkers in the fields of art and brain research.

PODCAST: The Magic Forest
[ 1 ] August 22, 2010

PODCAST: The Magic Forest

In this month’s podcast, Noah Hutton speaks with British artist Andrew Carnie, whose current installation at the GV Art Gallery in London uses slide projections to explore the evolving narrative of the brain.

re:COG

The Evolution of Chalkboard Torture
[ 6 ] October 18, 2011

The Evolution of Chalkboard Torture

Sam McDougle explains the purported evolutionary relevance of that horrible nails-on-chalkboard sound.

Free(r) Wills
[ 6 ] December 20, 2010

Free(r) Wills

Interesting new reasearch suggests that individuals perceive different “amounts” of free will in themselves vs. others.

Tools Don’t Suffer Fools
[ 4 ] September 21, 2010

Tools Don’t Suffer Fools

Language, upright posture, tool-making — these are examples of commonly cited “human-specific” behaviors. But how unique are these behaviors to us clever, hairless apes? New research on a bird from the South Pacific shows that some humbling evolutionary parallels can be lightly drawn between human and nonhuman tool-using behaviors.