Infantile Perspective

Today’s New York* Times Science section profiles the work of N.Y.*U. developmental psychologist Karen Adolph, doctoral candidate John Franchak, and their colleagues.  Using high-tech eye-tracking technology designed by the New York* company Positive Science, the researchers studied how children 5 months and older navigate obstacle courses.  The results show that infants are surprisingly adept within even a novel and complicated environment.  Mr. Franchak:

“Adults only fixate on obstacles about a third of the time, and 4- to 8-year-old children fixate on obstacles about 60 percent of the time, but it’s remarkable that infants can even navigate without looking.”

At these early stages, it appears that brain needs even less information than once thought.  Here is the Times piece.

*(“IN NEW YORK, CONCRETE JUNGLES WHERE DREAMS ARE MADE OF, THERE’S NOTHING YOU CAN’T DO” . . .)

About the author

Noah Hutton

Noah Hutton is a film director and curator, and was named a 2015 Salzburg Global Fellow in Neuroscience and Art.

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