Philip Glass on Music and the Brain

Here’s an interesting answer from composer Philip Glass in response to a question about timelessness in a New York Times Magazine Q&A alongside Beck, published today:

What do you both think about timelessness and your work, and how things in your work feel dated or not dated? 
GLASS: It all sounds dated. Because I can’t write that music again. I can’t write “Einstein on the Beach” again. I played from it in a concert the other day, and it’s like I never wrote it. My brain’s been rewired. I don’t think I’ve ever said this publicly, but I think that the music we write, it accurately reflects the way our brains work, and our brains are constantly evolving. Our brains are very plastic; they continue to grow.

About the author

Noah Hutton

Noah Hutton is a film director and curator, and was named a 2015 Salzburg Global Fellow in Neuroscience and Art.

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