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GALLERY: Visions of the Brain

[ 0 ] April 8, 2010

This exclusive online gallery coincides with the April edition of The Beautiful Brain Podcast, where host Noah Hutton interviews the three artists whose work is featured here. We are proud to present the work of Constance Jacobson, Audrey Goldstein, and Heidi Whitman– three brave and inventive artists who are exploring the wilderness of the human brain.

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Constance Jacobson

Jacobson’s Tome series grew out of a family connection to dementia and deals directly with the fear of a loss of self. Jacobson’s prints use the shape of an axial slice of the brain as a repeated motif. Her images are metaphors of the fluidity of ideas that eventually settle into patterns and tight networks of neurons that in turn form larger networks of interconnections. Jacobson’s Grey Matter Series explores memories that fade and reappear, trying to connect to other memories. By layering lotus leaves on brain imagery, she imposes visual simplicity, and in a sense, attempts to calm the unruly and complicated mind. Jacobson is Assistant Professor of Fine Arts ant the Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University, and her work appears in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the New York Public Library, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Fogg Art Museum, among others. [official site]

Notochord | Constance Jacobson | 30x44", india ink on paper Leakage | Constance Jacobson | 30x44", acrylic and collage on paper Neuronal Architecture | Constance Jacobson | 30x44", india ink on paper Tentacles | Constance Jacobson | 30x44", india ink on paper Gyri 1 | Constance Jacobson | monotype 11.75 x 10.75

Gyri 6 | Constance Jacobson | monotype 11.75 x 10.75

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Audrey Goldstein

Audrey Goldstein draws a parallel between micro- and macro-biological functions. In her new work Point to Point, a structure of thin metal rods stands for the pathways and connections between neurons and between people. Goldstein puts the structure in a “backpack” and carries it through her daily rounds. She hands participants a wire to knot or mark, with each mark representing the people to whom they feel close. This action interrupts their day while asking them to evaluate the emotional ties in their lives. The process of tying the wire shifts their focus on the physicality of a handmade narrative. The collected wires are gathered for use in her next Data Bearer piece, creating a new network of the participants’ lives. A video camera captures this macro-function of social networking so it can be reproduced in the gallery. Goldstein is the Fine Arts Program Director at the New England School of Art and Design at Suffolk University. [official site]

Generosity Generator | Audrey Goldstein | InstallationData Bearers | Audrey GoldsteinData Bearers - Detail | Audrey Goldstein

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Heidi Whitman

Whitman provides a link to the 21st century in a different way. She brings formal painting skills to bear on the contemporary interest in brain mapping. Whitman writes, “my work charts states of mind. I’m interested in how experience is translated into thought, how dreams jumble reality, and how memories are layered in the brain.” In her recent paper constructions Whitman uses shadows, contemporary city grids, and plans of ancient ruins to invoke memory and absence. Whitman exhibits nationally and teaches at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. [official site]

Brain Terrain 154 | Heidi Whitman | 45" x 33½", acrylic, flashe, and ink on panelBrain Terrain 233 | Heidi Whitman | 38" x 51½", gouache and ink on kitakata paperBrain Terrain 265 | Heidi Whitman | 31" x 45", acrylic, flashe, and ink on panelBrain Terrain (286, 285, 287) | Heidi Whitman | 8½" x 28", flashe, ink, and gouache on paperInvisible Cities - Brain Terrain 282 | Heidi Whitman | 23" x 29" x 3", gouache, acrylic, paper, and shadows on wallInvisible Cities - Brain Terrain 279 | Heidi Whitman | 33" x 35" x 3", gouache, acrylic, paper, and shadows on wall

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Hear interviews with each of the artists featured above in this month’s edition of The Beautiful Brain Podcast.

GALLERY: Images from Cajal’s Butterflies of the Soul

[ 5 ] February 8, 2010

In the nineteenth-century, pioneering investigators of the central nervous system had to compensate for primitive technology with extraordinary artistic talent.  These men produced drawings of their experimental slides in order to preserve the revelations therein.  Strange, complex, and utterly gorgeous, these figures are the inspiration for Cajal’s Butterflies of the Soul (2010) by Javier DeFelipe, reviewed here.  The book, published by Oxford University Press, contains two-hundred and eighty-two one-of-a-kind images, including the ones seen below:

Click to Englarge

GALLERY: Images from Cajal's Butterflies of the Soul

[ 2 ] February 8, 2010

In the nineteenth-century, pioneering investigators of the central nervous system had to compensate for primitive technology with extraordinary artistic talent.  These men produced drawings of their experimental slides in order to preserve the revelations therein.  Strange, complex, and utterly gorgeous, these figures are the inspiration for Cajal’s Butterflies of the Soul (2010) by Javier DeFelipe, reviewed here.  The book, published by Oxford University Press, contains two-hundred and eighty-two one-of-a-kind images, including the ones seen below:

Click to Englarge

GALLERY: Seeds of Thought: Paintings by Katherine Sherwood

[ 5 ] January 18, 2010

To accompany this month’s podcast on the neuropsychology of art, we are proud to present this exclusive online gallery of recent work by painter Katherine Sherwood. Click on each image to enlarge.

Katherine Sherwood’s acclaimed mixed-media paintings gracefully investigate the point at which the essential aspects of art, science, and disability intersect. After enduring a massive stroke in 1997, Sherwood was forced to paint using her left hand. Her works juxtapose abstracted medical images, such as cerebral angiograms of the artist’s brain, with fluid renderings of ancient patterns. In doing so, they mythically explore and reveal inner spaces and neural landscapes. Sherwood’s work was exhibited in the 2000 Whitney Biennial and at Yerba Buena Art Center in 2003. SherwoodSherwood has had solo exhibitions recently at Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco, Locks Gallery in Philadelphia, Cole Pratt Gallery in New Orleans,  Hemphill Gallery in Washington DC and Michael Kohn Gallery in Los Angeles. The interdisciplinary relevance of her work has led to her recent participation in “Visionary Anatomies” at the National Academy of Science in Washington DC, “Inside Out Loud: Visualizing Women’s Health in Contemporary Art” at the Kemper Museum in St. Louis and “Human Being” at the Chicago Cultural Center.  She co-curated the exhibition “Blind at the Museum” at the Berkeley Art Museum, and organized an accompanying conference at UC Berkeley, where she is also a professor in the Art Department.  Sherwood was a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship 2005-2006 and a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant 2006-2007.

Check out the January 2010 edition of The Beautiful Brain Podcast, which features an interview with Katherine Sherwood.

[visit official site]

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